What other types of permission are there?

//What other types of permission are there?
What other types of permission are there?2012-10-30T16:52:06+00:00

Listed Building

Listed Building Consent will be required together with a detailed planning application if you propose to carry out any work to a listed building.

Listed building consent will be needed to demolish a part or a whole building, or to alter or extend it in any way internally or externally which would affect its architectural or historical character.

Listed Building Consent will also be required if you are planning to erect any structures within the curtilage of the application site.

Always check with the local authority Planning Department first, it is a criminal offence to carry out any work to a listed building without consent prior to works. No additional fee is required (other than the fee to be submitted with the full plans application).

Conservation Areas

Consent will be required to demolish any building in a conservation area if it has a volume of more than 115 cubic meters, or any part of such building. Consent may also be required if you are demolishing walls, fences, railings or gates. No fees required.

Trees

Many trees have tree preservation orders (TPOs) which will mean that prior permission will be required to prune or fell a tree. Trees are often protected in conservation areas.

These exclude fruit or small decorative trees with trunks less than 100mm in diameter. Six weeks notice will be required before any work may be carried out.

Right of way

If your proposed building would obstruct a public path then consult with the local authority at an early stage. If they agree to the proposal then an order will be made to divert or extinguish the right of way. No work is to be commenced until the order has been confirmed.

Advertising

If you wanted to display an advertisement larger than 0.3m sq outside your property – including house names, numbers or even ‘beware of the dog’ signs, this may need consent. If in doubt, consult your local planning authority.

Temporary notices up to 0.6m sq relating to local events may be displayed for a short period.
Estate Agent boards in general should not be larger than 0.5m sq on each side and maybe banned in conservation areas.

Wildlife

If your proposed plans involve disturbing roosts of bats or other protected species then the English Nature (EN), the Countryside Council for Wales (CCW) or Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), whichever is appropriate must be notified.